Making Time To Write (As a Mom), Part 1

The laundry turns over and over again, in the heat of the dryer, buttons clicking together in the tumbling. Outside, crickets—no heavy hum of cicada, now that fall is here. The children are finally sleeping peacefully in their beds, my husband is in the middle of his late-shift job, and I enjoy the quiet of the last couple hours before I sleep.

downloadExcept the “quiet” of those hours doesn’t mean that they are necessarily restful hours—there’s always grading to catch up on, and dishes, and preparing for meals tomorrow, work tomorrow, odds and ends of housecleaning I didn’t get to during the day.

Even when the girls are asleep and I have time to myself, it is difficult to use that time for writing. Men have their own challenges with finding time to write, I’m sure, and I can’t speak to those, but what I can tell you is that it is difficult to make time for writing, even if it is your passion, when you are a mom.

My family’s needs are more pressing—there’s keeping house, cooking, grocery shopping, and making time for fun, then add a full-time job on top of that and where does writing fit in? Is it that important?

I say yes. Not only as a spiritual practice, but, if you are made to be a writer, like me, then it’s something you need to be doing, it’s part of your DNA, your make-up, making and creating like our Maker, our Creator.

I realize though too that there are some seasons of life where it is easier to put more time into your art than others, and the years where Bryan and I are growing our family are likely Not going to be the years that I am most productive in my writing. At first this idea made me feel like a failure. If I was a man, I would be free to write like I was meant to. If I didn’t have a family, I’d be free to write like I was meant to.

But those are lies! Sure, I probably would have more time to write—but that is not the only thing God created me to do, and God takes as much pleasure in his creation creating at the snails-pace of a work-mostly-at-home poet-mom like me as he does in the super-charged career-poet guy who can wake up writing and go to sleep writing.

So, making time to write—while I do think it is important and can be done in the busiest of schedules, there’s no hard and fast rule as to how much art you must “produce” in a year.

No need to beat yourself up as an artist for not writing as much as so-and-so or as you used to, or winning that prize, or snagging that publication. No need to doubt your calling if you don’t write everyday.

Especially when you are busy raising blue-eyed, lanky-limbed poems, wild and running free.

God gave us art just like he gave us his creation—to enjoy it, and, in enjoying it, to worship and enjoy Him.

31  Days

tomorrow, part 2!

Scripture Paraphrase

by Bryan Emerson

Scripture paraphrase is a longstanding church tradition, especially considering the Psalms.  The Jewish church sang the Psalter regularly in their worship practices, so it was only natural for the Christian church to desire to carry on the tradition.

During the Reformation, John Calvin had a nearly completed Psalter translated and paraphrased into meter.  It was immensely important to Calvin to sing only Scripture during worship, but he considered a good paraphrase to be quite edifying.

There are a few things to take into account when paraphrasing Scripture, though:

  1. A paraphrase is not authoritative.  Only the original manuscripts are without error, and while we trust that God has kept His word safe through the translation processes, all paraphrases are skewed toward the beliefs of the paraphraser, no matter how sound those beliefs may be
  1. A good paraphrase will always focus on the main idea of the passage.  Each Biblical passage has a primary message, and many will often have secondary and tertiary messages as well.  These secondary and tertiary messages may sometimes be used to help back up theological ideas, but they should never be used to base a theological argument.  In the same way, a paraphrase should never be built on the secondary or tertiary messages of a passage.
  1. Paraphrases may be strict or loose, so long as they do not stretch into heresy.  When trying to put Scripture into meter, you may go line by line and try to keep as much of the original text as you can; but you may also take the main ideas and details from the passage and make it more personal or poetic as you wish, as long as the main ideas are kept intact and still reflect good theology.

These are not the only things to take into account when paraphrasing, but these three will take you a long way.  Here are some of my favorite examples of Scripture paraphrases, in songwriting:

Jon Foreman – Equally SkilledMicah 7

Matt Redman – 10000 ReasonsPsalm 103

Martin Luther – A Mighty FortressPsalm 46

31  DaysFive Minute Free-Write: Have you ever paraphrased scripture in song-writing? What are the difficulties you found, when attempting to paraphrase?